Parenting teenagers

 

    Testimonials
Billie H.
Oregon
“I loved it, and am sharing it with children and adults alike! It makes you feel honored to be a part of a child's life and heart.”


The evolution from child to teenager is slow, yet it happens in the blink of an eye. Parenting teenagers is hard work, and many parents wonder how to make it easier.
One of the most effective methods of parenting is teaching your children good life lessons while they are young.

If your children know from an early age that if they make a mistake you will help them, they will be more likely to come to you as teenagers if they need help.  This is a lesson that can be taught in many ways. One example is the children’s book Jennifer Pennifer. This book for parents and children follows Jennifer on one of her many misadventures.

Parenting teenagers becomes much easier when they have been brought up in a loving and caring environment. Leslie Kuerbitz is the author of Jennifer Pennifer, a loving mom, and a Licensed Professional Counselor. In fact, Leslie’s daughter is the real Jennifer. The book combines Leslie’s real word experience raising her daughter with her professional ideas as a Licensed Professional Counselor.

Leslie worked professional experience, thoughts, and theories come from her days working as a training coordinator, family assistance coordinator and as crisis counselor for a municipal police department. During these jobs Leslie assisted many officers’ families who had been lost in line-of-duty as well as counseling victims of violent crimes. There is no doubt that these experiences lead Leslie to create a “guide” to parenting in order to encourage loving homes that would not give way to violence.

By working with individuals, couples, and families, Leslie has learned how hard parenting teenagers can be. Although her short book is intended to be read with small children the life lessons still apply. That the best home is one “where parents and children communicate lovingly with one another to provide emotional support and encourage mutual respect.” Who wouldn’t want to live in a house like that?